Sampling the best street food in Indonesia

Photo by CC user 65459962@N00 on Flickr

Indonesian street food is a joy that can be enjoyed anywhere in this country wherever there are hungry people and a street corner lined with carts.

However, some places are more renowned for their street food scene than others; Bandung, located in the highlands of West Java, is a city that is well-known among Indonesians for its high quality carts.

Located within a few hours of the massive city of Jakarta, hotels fill up here very quickly on weekends, so it is important that you book ahead using web sites such as traveloka.com.

If you’re looking for a great choice without having to search through all the listings, we personally recommend Kastuba Resort, as its breathtaking views will captivate you when you get up for your morning cup of coffee.

When you are ready to hit the town to sample the very best in Indonesian street food, be sure to keep your eyes peeled for the following dishes…

Satay

Photo by CC user 40843431@N00 on Flickr

Satay is a popular snack that will keep you going as you sightsee through the streets of Bandung or wherever you happen to find yourself in Indonesia.

They can consist of any type of meat you can think of, though pork skewers tend to be found primarily on Bali. Typically served with peanut sauce, it is a great way to stamp out hunger pangs between meals.

Soto

If you get caught out in a chilly downpour (given that Bandung is in the mountains, they actually can be), there is nothing that will bring you back to life quite like a bowl of Soto.

Widely considered to be Indonesia’s national dish due to its ubiquitous acceptance from Sumatra to Papua, this dish can take on a variety of forms depending on the region where you are.

Indeed, different cities lay claim to the best soto in the country, making the tasting of this dish in each destination a popular pastime for traveling foodies in Indonesia.

Bakso

There’s a specific type of soup that rises above all others in Indonesia though, as the meatballs in Bakso won fans across this diverse nation.

With balls made from ground beef, rice vermicelli noodles, vegetables and shallots, it is a familiar mainstay that will sustain you whether you find yourself on a Jakarta street corner, in an alleyway several blocks back from the beach in Kuta, or in some far-flung town on a comfort stop during a long-distance bus ride through Sumatra.

Nasi Padang

Photo by CC user Midori on Wikimedia Commons

When you walk the streets of any city in Indonesia, one shop that might stand out to you will be those that advertise the dish known as Nasi Padang.

With a variety of stacked bowls in the window containing a variety of foods, it is advertising a buffet that starts with a base of steamed rice, allowing you to then top it with a variety of curries, meats, and vegetables.

Similar to Nasi Kandar in Malaysia, there is no limit to the number of different lunches you can have at a place such as this.

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